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Monday, June 4, 2012

CP Rail service returning to normal

CP Rail service returning to normal June 4, 2012 Canadian Pacific Railway announced Sunday that it was successfully executing its start-up plan, following Federal legislation that ended a general strike. In a notice to its customers the company said: "The primary focus in the first 48 hours after starting up the Canadian operations was to return to normal production levels and restore Network fluidity. After 2 full days of operations, all staged trains are moving, local service has been restored and scheduled trains are operating, safely, as per plan." Over the next week, the Customer Service group will be working closely with you to manage supply chain imbalances, any backlog demand levels and heavy interchange traffic, as we continue to fully recover and restore your complete supply chain performance. We are successfully executing the plan and on our way to achieving a balanced operation and return to the performance and service levels you experienced before the work stoppage." TOP

Monday, April 2, 2012

Canada-Japan free trade agreement negotiations have begun

The launch of negotiations towards a free trade agreement between Canada and Japan was announced during Prime Minister Harper's visit to Tokyo last weekend.

A joint study published at the beginning of this month concludes that an agreement would deliver substantial gains for both countries, including increased economic output, GDP growth and consumer welfare, along with strengthened bilateral trade opportunities for energy, other natural resources and food products.

Canada will notably seek the elimination of Japan's tariffs across a broad range of sectors, including on agriculture, fish and seafood, forestry and industrial goods.

Canada and Japan are also considering ways that an agreement should reflect their mutual commitment to environmental protection and labour practices.

Japan is an important market for Canada. In 2011, bilateral merchandise trade between Canada and Japan totalled $23.7 billion.

Friday, March 30, 2012

Canada-Japan free trade agreement negotiations have begun

The launch of negotiations towards a free trade agreement between Canada and Japan was announced during Prime Minister Harper's visit to Tokyo last weekend.

A joint study published at the beginning of this month concludes that an agreement would deliver substantial gains for both countries, including increased economic output, GDP growth and consumer welfare, along with strengthened bilateral trade opportunities for energy, other natural resources and food products.

Canada will notably seek the elimination of Japan's tariffs across a broad range of sectors, including on agriculture, fish and seafood, forestry and industrial goods.

Canada and Japan are also considering ways that an agreement should reflect their mutual commitment to environmental protection and labour practices.

Japan is an important market for Canada. In 2011, bilateral merchandise trade between Canada and Japan totalled $23.7 billion.

Container volume up 7% on Canadian railroads in January

Statistics Canada announced that Canadian railways carried 24.9 million tonnes of freight in January, up 7.3% from January 2011.

On the domestic front, non-intermodal and intermodal loadings saw their combined volume rise 5.2% to 21.9 million tonnes over the same 12-month period.

Non-intermodal cargo loadings, which are typically carried in bulk or loaded in box cars, advanced 4.9% to 19.6 million tonnes. The commodity groups with the largest increases in tonnage were coal, wheat and colza seeds.

Intermodal freight loadings of containers and trailers loaded onto flat cars also grew but the increase occurred solely on the strength of containerized cargo shipments as trailers loaded onto flat cars declined. Railways carried 264,872 TEUs in January this year, compared to 247,377 TEUs for the same month last year, an increase of 7%.

Internationally, total rail freight traffic received from the United States experienced a 25.4% gain to 3.0 million tonnes.

Tribunal to review expiry of anti-dumping duties on bicycles from China and Taiwan

The Canadian International Trade Tribunal announced that it initiated an expiry review of its order concerning the dumping of certain bicycles from Taiwan and China.

In early February the Tribunal had informed interested persons and governments of the impending expiry of the order and solicited information on whether the order should be left to expire, or if a review for its continuation was warranted. On the basis of the information filed, the Tribunal is of the opinion that an expiry review of the order is warranted.

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) will now determine, by July 26, 2012, if there is a likelihood of resumed or continued dumping.

If the CBSA determines that the expiry of the order in respect of any goods is likely to result in the continuation or resumption of dumping, the Tribunal will conduct an expiry review to determine if the continued or resumed dumping is likely to result in injury or retardation to Canadian industry. The Tribunal will issue its order no later than December 7, 2012, and its statement of reasons no later than December 21, 2012.

The original decision by the Trade Tribunal goes back to 1992 and has been amended and prolonged several times, the last time on December 10, 2007.

Link: http://www.citt.gc.ca/dumping/reviews/notices/rr2l002_e.asp

Exploratory talks to begin on a Canada-Thailand free trade agreement

Canada and Thailand announced that they will pursue exploratory talks to examine the potential economic benefits of a free trade agreement. The announcement was made on March 23rd, during Prime Minister Harper's official visit to Thailand.

The exploratory talks will examine the potential economic benefits of a free trade agreement and how such an agreement would enhance the existing relationship between the two countries.

Thailand is Canada's largest bilateral merchandise trading partner within the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

It has a population of almost 66 million and an economy that experienced significant economic growth in 2010, expanding by 7.8 percent. Thailand's geographic position at the centre of ASEAN, its strong transport infrastructure, and its focus on foreign investment have made it a regional manufacturing hub and home to a significant petrochemical industry.

In 2011, the year that marked 50 years of diplomatic relations between the two countries, Canada's bilateral merchandise trade with Thailand totalled nearly $3.5 billion, an increase of 14.8 percent over 2010.

U.S. appeals WTO decision that declared its meat labelling rules illegal

The United States Government notified the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Dispute Settlement Body of its decision to appeal the November 2011 panel reports which determined that the U.S. country of origin labeling rules (COOL) for meat violate global trade rules.

The WTO dispute settlement panel had been established in November 2009 to hear Canada and Mexico's challenge to the U.S. legislation imposing mandatory country-of-origin labelling for beef, pork, lamb, chicken and goat meat, and certain perishable commodities sold at retail outlets in the U.S.

According to the U.S. rules, in order for meat to be labelled as a product of the U.S., all production activities (birth, rearing and slaughtering) have to occur in the U.S. For meat derived from animals of different national origins, the label must indicate the country or countries involved at each step, from the animal's birth to the final retail wrapping of meat cuts.

In contesting the U.S. rules Canada claimed that, in the context of the integrated North American beef and pork supply chains, U.S. COOL has resulted in additional and unnecessary costs being imposed on Canadian cattle and hog exports. Under the rules U.S. processors, for instance, have to segregate Canadian animals and the meat from these animals at their facilities, which generates additional costs. Because of these additional costs, some processors no longer buy Canadian animals, buy them only on certain days, or buy them at a discounted price. Thirteen WTO country members have joined as third parties in the dispute.

"The WTO panel decision recognized the integrated nature of the North American supply chain and marked a clear win for our industry," Canadian Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz said in a statement expressing disappointment with the U.S. appeal.

Parties to a WTO dispute can appeal a panel's ruling. Appeals have to be based on points of law, such as legal interpretation - they cannot re-open factual findings made by the panel. Each appeal is heard by three members of a permanent seven-member Appellate Body comprising persons of recognized authority and unaffiliated with any government.

Generally, the Appellate Body has up to 3 months to conclude its report.


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